Totalled Vs Totaled

Totalled Vs Totaled: 10 Main Differences + Examples [2024]

In English, people often use the words totalled Vs totaled interchangeably, but there are some small differences in how they’re used.

This article is gonna show you the ten main differences between these two words, with examples to make it clear.

which one is right -Totalled or Totaled? What’s the main answer?

Both “totaled” and “totalled” are the right ways to spell the past tense and past participle of the word “total.”

It just depends on where you’re from. In British English, people usually use “totalled,” while in American English, it’s more common to say “totaled.”

But honestly, both spellings are fine and people will understand you no matter which one you use.

For example, in British English, you might say, “The cost of repairs totalled £500,” and in American English, you might say, “The cost of repairs totaled $500.”

To sum it up, both “totalled” and “totaled” are correct, and it’s all about which spelling you prefer in your region.

1.Spelling of “totalled” and “totaled”:

The spelling of “totalled” and “totaled” can be different depending on where you are and how you like to spell.

Both spellings are okay, but people might use them differently depending on what kind of English they speak. In British English, “totalled” is the one people usually go with.

It’s how they spell the past tense and past participle of the word “total” by adding “-ed” at the end. Like, “The repairs totalled £500.”

In American English, “totaled” is more common. They usually drop the second “l” when they make the past tense and past participle of certain words.

For example, “The car was totaled in the accident.” It’s good to know that even though “totalled” is more popular in British English and “totaled” in American English, there can still be exceptions and differences within each one.

The situation and what people like can also affect which spelling they use.So basically, both “totalled” and “totaled” are okay, with “totalled” being more common in British English and “totaled” in American English.

It’s a good idea to follow the spelling rules of the English you’re using or go with what you personally like.

 

You might also enjoy: Freshman Vs Freshmen: 10 Main Differences/Similarities

 

2. Verb forms totalled Vs totaled:

The verb forms “totalled” and “totaled” are both correct and widely used in English, but they might be used differently depending on where you are.

In British English, they prefer to say “totalled,” while in American English, they usually say “totaled.” Both forms come from the noun “total,” which means the sum of a bunch of numbers or quantities.

Here are some examples of how you can use these verb forms: 1. “The accountant totalled up the expenses for the month.” (British English) 2. “The car accident totaled the car.” (American English) 3.

“She carefully totaled up the scores of the game.” (American English) So as you can see, whether you say “totalled” or “totaled” depends on which kind of English you’re speaking.

It’s important to stick with the same way of saying it in order to make sense in your writing or conversation.

Basically, both “totalled” and “totaled” are okay to use as verbs, with “totalled” being more common in British English and “totaled” being more common in American English.

3. Meaning of these two words:

The words “totalled” and “totaled” are like different ways to spell the same word, and they both mean the past tense and past participle of the word “total.” The word “total” can mean different things depending on how you use it.

1. To add up numbers:

In this case, “total” means to add up or put together individual amounts to get a final sum. For example: – “I added up all the expenses for the month and figured out we spent $1000.” – “The cashier added up the prices of everything in my shopping cart.”

2. To completely mess something up:

In this case, “total” means to really mess up or destroy something. It’s usually used when talking about accidents or disasters.

For example: – “The car accident messed up my car big time; it couldn’t be fixed.”– “The hurricane destroyed several houses along the coast.”

Both “totalled” and “totaled” are okay ways to spell it, and which one you use depends on where you’re from or what style guide you follow.

It’s good to know that “totalled” is more common in British English, while “totaled” is more common in American English.

So, to sum it up, “totalled” and “totaled” mean the same thing and can refer to the past tense and past participle of the word “total.”

They can mean adding up numbers or messing things up, depending on how you use them.

 

You might also enjoy: Affirm Vs Confirm In English: 10 Differences You Need To Know

 

4. Usage of “totaled” and “totalled”  in Financial Context:

In a financial context, both “totaled” and “totalled” can be used to talk about adding up numbers or amounts.

But in American English, people usually say “totaled,” and in British English, people usually say “totalled.” Here are a few examples of how these words are used in finance:

1. “The project’s totalled cost was $100,000.” (American English) “The project’s totalled cost was £100,000.” (British English)

2. “The company made a totalled revenue of $1 million for the year.” (American English) “The company made a totalled revenue of £1 million for the year.”

(British English) It’s important to know that even though “totaled” is more common in American English, both spellings are generally understood in finance. But it’s a good idea to use the spelling that matches the type of English you’re using to be consistent.

5. Usage of “totaled” and “totalled”  in Sports:

In sports, both “totaled” and “totalled” can be used to talk about adding up scores, points, or stats. But in American English, we usually say “totaled,” while in British English, they say “totalled” more.

When you want to talk about adding up scores or points in a game or competition, you can say things like “The team’s scores were totaled at the end of the match” or “The final score totaled 50 points.

” Basically, “totaled” or “totalled” means adding up individual scores or points to get a final total.

Just remember, even though both spellings are okay, you gotta stick with what the people in your area or audience use.

If you’re writing for Americans, go with “totaled,” and if it’s for Brits, use “totalled.”

So yeah, both “totaled” and “totalled” work for adding up scores or points in sports. You just gotta pick the one that matches your audience.

In a nutshell, “totaled” is more common in American English and “totalled” is more common in British English when it comes to adding up scores or points.

6. Regional Variations of “totaled” and “totalled” :

Regional differences in spelling are pretty common in English, and words like “totaled” and “totalled” are no exception.

Both spellings are considered correct, but it really depends on where you are using them. In American English, the preferred way is “totaled” with just one “l.”

People in the United States use this spelling a lot and consider it the standard. On the other hand, in British English and other varieties influenced by British spelling, like Canadian English and Australian English, the preferred way is “totalled” with two “l’s.”

This way of spelling follows the rule of doubling the consonant when adding “-ed” to words that end with a consonant right after a short vowel sound.

It’s worth noting that these differences in spelling don’t change the meaning or use of the word. Whether you go with “totaled” or “totalled” depends on the specific style guide or regional preference you’re following.

 

You might also enjoy: Sensitive Vs Sensible [Video + Examples] 2023

 

7. Frequency of Use:

The spellings “totaled” and “totalled” can be used differently depending on where you are and how you’re using them.

In American English, people usually spell it “totaled” with just one “l”. That’s the accepted way in the United States for things like writing, official papers, and everyday talking.

In British English and other places that follow British spelling, like Canada and Australia, the spelling “totalled” with two “l’s” is more common.

That’s because it follows the rule of doubling the consonant when you add “-ed” to a word that ends in a consonant after a short vowel sound.

It’s also important to know that how often people use one spelling or the other can depend on the situation.

For example, when people talk about a car getting ruined in an accident, they usually say “totaled” no matter where they’re from.

In the end, both spellings are right, but how often people use them can change depending on where they are and what they’re talking about.

8. Contextual Considerations of “totaled” and “totalled”:

When you think about the different ways “totaled” and “totalled” are spelled, there are a bunch of things to consider.

Stuff like where you’re from, what industry you’re in, and the style guide you’re using all play a part. Depending on where you’re at in the US, you’ll probably see “totaled” spelled with just one “l” most of the time.

People use this spelling for all kinds of things, like insurance claims, financial reports, and just everyday talking.

But in places like the UK, Canada, and Australia, they tend to go with “totalled” spelled with double “l”. That’s because it follows the rule of doubling the consonant when adding “-ed” to a word that ends in a consonant with a short vowel sound.

Sometimes, the industry or context you’re in can also affect which spelling is preferred.

For example, in the car business, they use “totaled” to talk about a car that’s been wrecked beyond repair.

This is the same in all parts of the US and lines up with the standard American spelling.

But in other industries, like finance or accounting, you might see both spellings used interchangeably, depending on where you are or what style guide you follow.

Style guides, like The Chicago Manual of Style or The Associated Press Stylebook, can give you tips on which spelling to use based on who’s going to read it or where it’s getting published.

These guides are all about keeping things consistent and clear. So, if you want to make sure you’re using the right spelling in a specific situation, it’s a good idea to check the style guide that applies.

So, to sum it all up, when it comes to “totaled” and “totalled”, you’ve got to think about where you are, what industry you’re in, and what the style guide says. Knowing the right spelling for the situation will help you communicate clearly and consistently.

 

You might also enjoy: Only Vs Just All You Need to Know + Examples

 

9. Consistency of these two words:

The way we spell “totaled” and “totalled” can be different depending on where you are and what language rules you follow. In American English, the preferred spelling is “totaled” with one “l.”

This is the spelling most people use in the United States, and it follows the general rules of American English.

In British English and other varieties influenced by British spelling, like Canadian English and Australian English, the preferred spelling is “totalled” with double “l.”

This follows the rule of doubling the consonant when adding “-ed” to words that end in a consonant after a short vowel sound.

It’s important to remember that spelling consistently is important for clear communication. When you write, it’s a good idea to stick to the spelling rules of your region or style guide.

This helps keep things consistent and clear for your readers. However, it’s worth mentioning that with globalization and digital communication, both spellings are accepted in many contexts.

As long as you’re consistent within your own writing, either spelling should be fine and won’t cause any problems.

10. Personal Preference “totaled” and “totalled”:

People have different opinions on how to spell “totaled” and “totalled” based on things like where they’re from, what kind of English they’ve been exposed to, and how they like to write. Both spellings are considered correct, but some people prefer one over the other.

If you mainly use American English or are more familiar with American spelling, you probably prefer “totaled” with one “l.” This is the standard spelling in the United States and you’ll see it in American publications and official documents.

If you grew up or were educated in an American English environment, this spelling feels more natural to you. On the other hand, if you have a background in British English or have been exposed to British spelling, you likely prefer “totalled” with two “l’s.”

This follows the rule of doubling the consonant when adding “-ed” to words that end in a consonant preceded by a short vowel sound. If you’ve read British English literature or been educated in Britain, this spelling feels more familiar. It’s important to note that personal preference can also be influenced by your own writing style and what you think looks or sounds better.

Your writing style, including things like rhythm and flow, can shape your preferences. The context in which you use the word can also influence your preference. For example, if you often write about vehicle accidents or insurance claims, you might prefer “totaled” because it’s commonly used in that specific context.

Ultimately, everyone has their own preference when it comes to spelling “totaled” and “totalled.” We should respect and acknowledge these preferences while also considering regional conventions and the context in which the word is used.

Conclusion:

While “totalled” and “totaled” can be used interchangeably, knowing their small differences can help writers pick the right word based on the situation and who they’re talking to. Whether it’s the British way or the American way, both words mean calculating a total or talking about complete destruction.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Omid Naeemi close up image with an orange background

Hi there, welcome to my website! I’m Omid and now you are reading the text of a passionate teacher. I’ve been teaching the English language for about 12 years while applying different updated methods of teaching. It’s my absolute pleasure that you are visiting my website. Here we go with the hope of improving your English language capabilities using various methods. Let’s learn English together here.